The origins of National Health Insurance

The White Paper on National Health Insurance was published on 11 December.

This draft policy has its origins in debates that emerged in the late 1980s.

For those of you interested in the history of these debates, read the publication below that was published by Wits University’s Centre for Health Policy in 2000.

The document talks about the important design features of different policy proposals during the 1990s, as well as the lessons learned during this time with respect to managing the process of policy development.

The document is out of print, but I’ve managed to resurrect it using an old copy.

Doherty J, McIntyre D, Gilson L, Thomas S, Brijlal V, Bowa C, Mbatsha S. 2000. Social health insurance in South Africa: past, present and future. Johannesburg: Centre for Health Policy, for the Centre for Health Policy (University of the Witwatersrand) and the Health Economics Unit (University of Cape Town).

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Achieving universal health coverage in Africa: is there a role for formal for-profit providers?

Here is the link for a blog post that has just been published on Oxfam’s Global Health Check – it summarises the recommendations of the paper in my previous post.

Doherty J. 2015. Achieving universal health coverage in Africa: is there a role for formal for-profit providers? Global Health Check. Available at: http://www.globalhealthcheck.org/?p=1841

Will for-profit private providers help low- and middle-income countries reach universal health coverage?

Doherty J. 2015. Achieving universal health coverage in East and Southern Africa: what role for for-profit providers? Paper presented as part of Panel Session T03P13: Private sector and universal health coverage – examining evidence and deconstructing rhetoric. DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.1993.9682. The International Conference on Public Policy, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milan, Italy, 1-4 July 2015.

This paper cautions that regulatory frameworks governing the behaviour of the for-profit private health sector in Africa are weak.

These frameworks need to be strengthened before promoting the growth of the for-profit private health sector.

This is because, if poorly regulated, the behaviour of the for-profit health sector can lead to health system distortions that undermine progress towards universal access to affordable, quality health care.

More detail on legislation in the region can be found in:

Doherty J. 2015. Regulating the for-profit private health sector: lessons from East and Southern Africa. Health Policy and Planning; 30(3); i93-i102. doi: 10.1093/heapol/czu111.

Universal health coverage assessment: South Africa

If anyone missed this in an earlier blog, I’ve posted a preliminary assessment of South Africa’s progress towards universal health coverage here.

The purpose of the assessment is to use what data are available to analyse the extent to which South Africans are enjoying financial protection against the costs of using health care services, and accessing the services they need.

Getting South Africa ready for National Health Insurance: critical next steps

Here are the powerpoint slides for a recent presentation I gave about National Health Insurance to a Symposium by Economic Research Southern Africa (ERSA) on 6 February 2014:   ERSA NHI presentation_Jane Doherty 

The theme of the Symposium was “Critical choices regarding universal health coverage” and it was held at the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study.

My presentation was titled “Getting South Africa ready for NHI: critical next steps.” 

If you look on ERSA’s website you will find more details on the Symposium.

Legislation on the for-profit private health sector in East and Southern Africa

Here is some information on my latest policy brief, as well as the report on which it is based:

 

EQUINET Policy Brief 35: Legislation on the for-profit private health sector in East and Southern Africa

Doherty J (2013) with UCT HEU, TARSC. Wemos Foundation,  Policy brief 35, EQUINET, Harare

At http://www.equinetafrica.org/bibl/docs/Pol%2035%20finregs.pdf

 

While the private sector contributes new resources to the health system, international evidence shows that if left unregulated it may distort the quantity, distribution and quality of health services, and lead to anti-competitive behaviour. As the for-profit private sector is expanding in east and southern African (ESA) countries, governments need to strengthen their regulation of the sector to align it to national health system objectives. This policy brief examines how existing laws in the region address the quantity, quality, distribution and price of private health care services, based on evidence made available from desk review and in-country experts. It proposes areas for strengthening the regulation of individual health care practitioners, private facilities and health insurers.  A more detailed discussion paper (#87) on the laws and information in the brief is available at www.equinetafrica.org/bibl/docs/EQ%20Diss%2087%20Private%20HS.pdf.

Regulating the for-profit private health sector in Africa

EQUINET (the Network on Equity in Health in Southern Africa) have just published an editorial and report on legislation governing the for-profit private health sector in east and southern Africa. To access these publications, click on the links below:

 

Doherty J. 2013. We cannot afford to leave the for-profit private health sector unregulated in Africa (editorial). EQUINET Newsletter 150: 01 August 2013. Available at: http://www.equinetafrica.org/newsletter/

 

Doherty J. 2013. Legislation on the for-profit private health sector in east and southern Africa. EQUINET Discussion Paper 99.  Harare: HEU, EQUINET. Available at: http://www.equinetafrica.org/bibl/docs/Diss%2099%20privsector%20laws%20Aug2013.pdf