Training health system leaders

One of the key reasons for weak public health systems is poor leadership.

It is urgent to up-skill aspirant leaders if countries want to achieve universal health coverage.

Here are some tips on how to do this in a way that is sensitive to the needs of workplaces:

Doherty J, Gilson L. 2015. Workplace-based learning for health systems leaders. London: RESYST Consortium. 

 

Advertisements

Achieving universal health coverage in Africa: is there a role for formal for-profit providers?

Here is the link for a blog post that has just been published on Oxfam’s Global Health Check – it summarises the recommendations of the paper in my previous post.

Doherty J. 2015. Achieving universal health coverage in Africa: is there a role for formal for-profit providers? Global Health Check. Available at: http://www.globalhealthcheck.org/?p=1841

Will for-profit private providers help low- and middle-income countries reach universal health coverage?

Doherty J. 2015. Achieving universal health coverage in East and Southern Africa: what role for for-profit providers? Paper presented as part of Panel Session T03P13: Private sector and universal health coverage – examining evidence and deconstructing rhetoric. DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.1993.9682. The International Conference on Public Policy, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milan, Italy, 1-4 July 2015.

This paper cautions that regulatory frameworks governing the behaviour of the for-profit private health sector in Africa are weak.

These frameworks need to be strengthened before promoting the growth of the for-profit private health sector.

This is because, if poorly regulated, the behaviour of the for-profit health sector can lead to health system distortions that undermine progress towards universal access to affordable, quality health care.

More detail on legislation in the region can be found in:

Doherty J. 2015. Regulating the for-profit private health sector: lessons from East and Southern Africa. Health Policy and Planning; 30(3); i93-i102. doi: 10.1093/heapol/czu111.

Leadership from ‘below:’ clinical staff and public hospitals in South Africa

Here is the link for a briefing document I produced recently on the topic of clinical leadership:

Doherty J. 2014. Leadership from ‘below:’ clinical staff and public hospitals in South Africa. Briefing note No. 4. Municipal Services Project. Available at: http://www.municipalservicesproject.org/publication/leadership-below-clinical-staff-and-public-hospitals-south-africa

 

 

Developing clinical leadership as a strategy for hospital transformation at district level

Here is the poster I presented last week at the Third Global Symposium on Health Systems Research, International Convention Centre, Cape Town, 1-3 October:  Jane Doherty

It summarises findings from a study on developing clinical leadership as a strategy for hospital transformation in district hospitals.

Leadership from ‘below’?: clinical staff and public hospitals in South Africa

In earlier posts I’ve referred to two relatively lengthy reports on clinical leadership – one a literature review and the other reporting findings from interviews with clinical leaders in South African district hospitals.

The main findings from these reports are now summarised in a policy note that is applicable to practitioners from other sectors.

 

 

Clinical leadership in district hospitals in South Africa

Here is a report based on interviews with clinical staff at South African district hospitals about their leadership roles:

2014_Improving public hospitals through clinical leadership

 

The study was conducted for the Municipal Services Project which is located at the School of Government, University of the Western Cape, Republic of South Africa, and funded by the International Development Research Centre of Canada.