Building capacity for priority-setting

Colleagues and I have just published a new article in the journal, Global Health Action.

It is titled Strengthening expertise for health technology assessment and priority-setting in Africa.

As the article explains, “The focus on priority-setting is in response to the urgent need to ensure scarce resources are used effectively in support of Universal Health Coverage, and the scant literature discussing how technical economic evaluations should be integrated into highly political and complex priority-setting processes. Researchers’ roles in developing capacity in these areas are highlighted because few African governments have technology assessment units that can take responsibility for driving formal priority-setting processes.”

Training health system leaders

One of the key reasons for weak public health systems is poor leadership.

It is urgent to up-skill aspirant leaders if countries want to achieve universal health coverage.

Here are some tips on how to do this in a way that is sensitive to the needs of workplaces:

Doherty J, Gilson L. 2015. Workplace-based learning for health systems leaders. London: RESYST Consortium. 

 

Leadership from ‘below:’ clinical staff and public hospitals in South Africa

Here is the link for a briefing document I produced recently on the topic of clinical leadership:

Doherty J. 2014. Leadership from ‘below:’ clinical staff and public hospitals in South Africa. Briefing note No. 4. Municipal Services Project. Available at: http://www.municipalservicesproject.org/publication/leadership-below-clinical-staff-and-public-hospitals-south-africa

 

 

Leadership from ‘below’?: clinical staff and public hospitals in South Africa

In earlier posts I’ve referred to two relatively lengthy reports on clinical leadership – one a literature review and the other reporting findings from interviews with clinical leaders in South African district hospitals.

The main findings from these reports are now summarised in a policy note that is applicable to practitioners from other sectors.

 

 

Clinical leadership in district hospitals in South Africa

Here is a report based on interviews with clinical staff at South African district hospitals about their leadership roles:

2014_Improving public hospitals through clinical leadership

 

The study was conducted for the Municipal Services Project which is located at the School of Government, University of the Western Cape, Republic of South Africa, and funded by the International Development Research Centre of Canada.

Clinical leadership: a literature review

Here is a review of international and South African  literature on the concept of clinical leadership in hospitals: Strengthening clinical leadership in hospitals: a review of international and South African literature

The review was conducted for the Municipal Services Project which is located at the School of Government, University of the Western Cape, Republic of South Africa, and funded by the International Development Research Centre of Canada.

Launch of the WONCA Rural Medical Education Guidebook

I have been privileged to contribute a chapter to the recently launched “WONCA Rural Medical Education Guidebook.” 

The book may be accessed online for free: click on the title above if you want to go to the website.

Here is my chapter: 2014_Models for undergraduate rural health placements.

The full reference is:

  • Doherty J. 2014. Chapter 4.3.1. Models for undergraduate rural health placements. In: Chater AB, Rourke J, Couper ID, Strasser RP, Reid S (eds). WONCA Rural Medical Education Guidebook. World Organisation of Family Doctors (WONCA): WONCA Working Party on Rural Practice. Available at: www.globalfamilydoctor.com.

 

 

Partnering professional leadership with good management

A colleague drew my attention to this blog post by Becky Malby, Director of the Centre for Innovation in Health Management at Leeds University in the UK:  The potential of UK/South Africa collaboration in health leadership and management.

In the blog she reflects on her recent visit to South Africa and suggests some priorities for health system transformation which I find refreshing.

Her suggestions speak to the issue of how to restore order to a highly complex and sometimes floundering health system: should (and can) order be imposed from above or are more local, dynamic solutions required?

Harnessing clinical academic leadership to transform rural health systems

Here are the powerpoint slides for a presentation I gave on behalf of colleagues at the most recent Prince Mahidol Award Conference which was held in Thailand between 27 and 31 January 2014.

The theme of the conference “Transformative Learning for Health Equity” and it focused on issues around the production of human resources to achieve universal health coverage. You can look at more presentations from the conference on the conference website.

The title of our paper was:  Doherty J, Couper I, Campbell D, Walker J. 2014. Transforming rural health systems through clinical academic leadership: lessons from South Africa:  PS2.1 Jane Doherty